Shop Now Login/Register View Quote View Cart
1.800.221.5175
Mathematics
Core Math
Sadlier Math Grades K–6 View Details | Buy Now
Progress in Mathematics Grades K–6 View Details | Buy Now
Progress in Mathematics Grades 7–8+ View Details | Buy Now
Supplemental
Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 View Details | Buy Now
New Jersey Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 Buy Now
New York Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 Buy Now
Common Core Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 Buy Now
Let's Target Math Problem Solving Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Real-World Math Word Problems Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Critical Thinking for Active Math Minds Grades 3–6 View Details | Buy Now
Preparing for Standards-Based Assessments Grades 7–8 View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary
Vocabulary Workshop Enriched Edition Grades 1–5 View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Achieve Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Achieve Interactive Edition Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Enriched Edition Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Interactive Edition Grades 2–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary for Success Grades 6–10 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Vocabulary Acquisition Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Vocabulary and Usage Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Building an Enriched Vocabulary Grades 9–12 View Details | Buy Now
English Language Arts
Progress English Language Arts Grades K-8 View Details | Buy Now
New Jersey Progress English Language Arts Grades K–8 Buy Now
New York Progress English Language Arts Grades K–8 Buy Now
Common Core Progress English Language Arts Grades K–8 Buy Now
Grammar & Writing
Grammar Workshop, Tools for Writing Grades 3–5 View Details | Buy Now
Grammar for Writing Grades 6–12 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Grammar Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Writing Workshop Grades 6–12 Buy Now
Writing a Research Paper Grades 6–12 Buy Now
Grammar & Writing for Standardized Tests Grades 9–12 Buy Now
Reading
From Phonics to Reading Grades K–3 View Details | Buy Now
Close Reading of Complex Texts Grades 3–8 View Details | Buy Now
Close Reading of Complex Texts Interactive Edition Grades 3–8 View Details | Buy Now
Sadlier Phonics Grades K–3 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Comprehension Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now

Sadlier's
English Language Arts Blog

The home of Vocab Gal and other educational experts K–12 resources

October 30, 2019 Vocab Gal, ELA PD - Literacy, ELA K-5, ELA 6-8, ELA Resources - Tip Sheets, ELA 9-12, ELA PD - Leadership, ELA PD - Other, ELA PD - Vocabulary, ELA Focus - Grammar, ELA Focus - Vocabulary

Role of Librarian in Schools –Seven Ways They Can Help Teachers, Coaches, & Admins

Teachers, academic coaches, and administrators never have enough time, resources, money, or books. However, I have found an unlikely source for all four—school libraries. In this article, we'll explore the diverse role of librarian in schools, how librarians can support instruction, and the school library resources often overlooked by teachers, coaches, principals, and administrators. Plus, I have a free printable tip sheet that outlines seven ways librarians can help in curriculum planning.In this article, we'll explore the diverse role of librarian in schools, how librarians can support instruction, and the school library resources often overlooked by teachers, principals, and administrators.  Plus, I have a free printable tip sheet that outlines seven ways librarians can help in curriculum planning.

The Role of Librarian in Schools

Having become a teacher librarian myself serendipitously when our school librarian quit, I have learned a great deal from the other side of the checkout desk. I now interact with many more teachers, literally drink the Koolaid, okay really tea, the administrators are serving, and have discovered so many resources I didn’t know our school had.

I’ve realized that librarians are teachers, too, and they have time, money, and knowledge to help teachers, coaches and administrators in their myriad of tasks. Neil Gaiman stated, “Google can bring you back a hundred thousand answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.” We can do that, and so much more!

Librarians are teachers, too, and they have time, money, and knowledge to help teachers, coaches and admins in their myriad of tasks.

Librarians can provide valuable research instruction, aid significantly in content alignment, create classroom libraries, and provide alternative reading materials for students. Furthermore, librarians can help teachers create projects, special events and even bring in authors-all you have to do is ask!

Download the Let the Librarian Do It! Tip Sheet and share the seven ways the librarian can help faculty at your school with curriculum planning and implementation!

LetTheLibrarianDoIt_TipSheet_thumb_750px

ELA-Download

7 Ways the School Librarian Can Help

1.) Librarians Can Provide Research Instruction

I desperately want to help make research easier for all teachers and students and would love to teach research all the time, to all of the classes. However, many teachers are anxious about giving up time and control in their classrooms and also worry about looking ignorant in front of the students and/or librarian.

Most librarians don’t judge—they just help! If teachers and coaches provide set parameters about what skills should be taught and a project’s time frame, most librarians will do all the work! I know many librarians who will grade annotated bibliographies and works cited pages, too.

If teachers and coaches provide set parameters about what skills should be taught and a project’s time frame, most librarians will do all the work!

2.) Teacher-Librarians Can Improve Content Alignment

Bringing a certified teacher-librarian into curriculum meetings can improve content alignment drastically as s/he is able to provide instruction to all students! Administrators and coaches who can tap into a librarian’s ability to provide literacy and research instruction can significantly impact student improvement throughout a grade level. Again, the value of the librarian cannot be overstated, as s/he has the time to present the same lesson to all students and the consistency of that instruction makes a huge difference to student learning.

3.) Help Teachers Build Their Classroom Library

I am still astounded by all the money I spent on my classroom library when the same books were on the shelves of our school library, and I just didn’t take the time to bring down my students. Now, I had good reasons for not wanting to send individual students to the library when many of them would circle the school a few times before sauntering into the library and then failing to check out a book. I knew I couldn’t personally hand select books for students in the library if I was also expected to be monitoring the daily independent reading in my classroom.

4.) Enrich Curriculum With Author Visits

Having students meet authors is one of the best parts of being a teacher librarian. I geek out as much as students do about the fantastic people and the stories they create. However, as a teacher I didn’t have enough time to deal with all the logistics of an author visit, nor was I able to get funding easily.

The school librarian often has a budget that can be tapped for author visits, and can often partner with the public library to co-host events and bring authors to your school as well as to their library[1]. Let your librarian provide these unique opportunities and make suggestions on how they can work with the initiatives and books you are already establishing and promoting.

The school librarian often has a budget for author visits, and can partner with the public library to co-host events and bring authors to your school.

Hosting an actual author brings a different level of enthusiasm for the book or theme a teacher or school is focused on, and students remember the visit and the messages long after the exciting day has come and gone.

5.) Promote Audiobooks To Improve Literacy For All

I’m always encouraging our staff to read, but, recognizing the multiple demands put on every member of our building, I have been promoting the use of audiobooks as an alternative to sitting and reading. Staff from our custodian to our principal have embraced this alternative story delivery concept and can now begin to keep up with titles read by students and adults. Research shows that schools where adults are actively reading every day promotes literacy far more effectively than those schools that emphasize reading worksheets.  

I have also promoted audiobook usage to our students, and several students who claimed never to have read any of their assigned reading, actually were able to complete their readings because they didn’t have to sit down in order to complete the task. The audiobook-positive culture being created allows students to embrace reading and literacy, no matter what their lexile level, and they actually make major strides in reading instruction when the audio and visual book media are paired.

6.) Execute STEM/STEAM Activities in the School Library

The “Makerspace” movement in libraries has been gaining STEAM (pedagogy pun), and most schools have unique items that can make individual projects come alive. Teachers can work with the school librarian to brainstorm STEAM projects, and also have the librarian help execute the activities.

Two years ago, I downloaded the free app Stop Motion that creates stop motion animation movies. The Spanish Two students made brilliant movies using old toy figurines and Legos to communicate their knowledge of verb tenses and family vocabulary. I also have an entire drawer full of old CDs and keyboards to take apart, scrap fabric, and all kinds of goofy odds and ends that can inspire students’ creativity. These are great resources for teachers to utilize when executing STEM/STEAM activities.

Teachers can work with the school librarian to brainstorm STEAM projects, and also have the librarian help execute the activities.

Finally, the school librarian can help monitor students, be another set of hands to help students with their projects and, overall make an open-ended project less intimidating for educators and students.

7.) Provide Space for Events and Final Projects

As a teacher, I always wanted a unique space for our final projects and celebrations. I often asked my librarian if I could host my events in the library, and she always said yes. I, however, was one of the only teachers to do so. I encourage the library to be used in as many ways as possible; I hosted the NCTE African-American Read-In, TedX talks, Socratic Seminars, the Battle of the Books competition, and more for various teachers this past year.

The library is a welcome, inviting, playful, and scholarly space that shows students that their work is meaningful and their discussions are worthy. Don’t forget to just use the space whenever you can to change up the atmosphere for your students.

In Summary

So look no further than your school or local library for the extra time, money, and (audio)books that you need. From providing classroom libraries and content instruction, to offering project materials and a beautiful space for events, your librarian is a vital part of your school and should be utilized whenever possible.

 

 

 

 

[1] Local bookstores also have ways of bringing authors to schools, so I encourage you to befriend the bookstore owners in your area!