Shop Now Login/Register View Quote View Cart
1.800.221.5175
Mathematics
Core Math
Sadlier Math Grades K–6 View Details | Buy Now
Progress in Mathematics Grades K–6 View Details | Buy Now
Progress in Mathematics Grades 7–8+ View Details | Buy Now
Supplemental
Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 View Details | Buy Now
New Jersey Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 Buy Now
New York Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 Buy Now
Common Core Progress Mathematics Grades K–8 Buy Now
Let's Target Math Problem Solving Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Real-World Math Word Problems Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Critical Thinking for Active Math Minds Grades 3–6 View Details | Buy Now
Preparing for Standards-Based Assessments Grades 7–8 View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary
Vocabulary Workshop, Tools for Comprehension Grades 1–5 View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop, Tools for Comprehension Interactive Edition Grades 2–5 View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Achieve Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Achieve Interactive Edition Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Enriched Edition Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary Workshop Enriched Edition Interactive Edition Grades 6–12+ View Details | Buy Now
Vocabulary for Success Grades 6–10 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Vocabulary Acquisition Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Vocabulary and Usage Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Building an Enriched Vocabulary Grades 9–12 View Details | Buy Now
English Language Arts
Progress English Language Arts Grades K-8 View Details | Buy Now
New Jersey Progress English Language Arts Grades K–8 Buy Now
New York Progress English Language Arts Grades K–8 Buy Now
Common Core Progress English Language Arts Grades K–8 Buy Now
Grammar & Writing
Grammar Workshop, Tools for Writing Grades 3–5 View Details | Buy Now
Grammar for Writing Grades 6–12 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Grammar Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now
Writing Workshop Grades 6–12 Buy Now
Writing a Research Paper Grades 6–12 Buy Now
Grammar & Writing for Standardized Tests Grades 9–12 Buy Now
Reading
From Phonics to Reading Grades K–3 View Details | Buy Now
Close Reading of Complex Texts Grades 3–8 View Details | Buy Now
Close Reading of Complex Texts Interactive Edition Grades 3–8 View Details | Buy Now
Sadlier Phonics Grades K–3 View Details | Buy Now
Let's Target Comprehension Grades 1–8 View Details | Buy Now

Sadlier's
English Language Arts Blog

The home of Vocab Gal and other educational experts K–12 resources

January 2, 2020 CL Seasonal Activities Winter, ELA Seasonal - Winter, ELA K-5, ELA 6-8, ELA Focus - Close Reading, ELA Resources - Activities, Core Literacy

Model Close Reading Annotation Using "I Have a Dream" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Every January, I take time to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with students by: reading about his life, listening to his speeches, and discussing his message. Today I am sharing with you how I work on the critical close reading concept of annotating a text using Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Plus, I've created a free printable "I Have a Dream" Close Reading Kit you can download. 

model-close-reading-annotation-with-i-have-a-dream-close-reading-kit

Recently I wrote an article explaining how I teach my students to annotate a text. In case you missed it here is a brief overview of the benefits and process of annotating a complex text during close reading.

Benefits of Annotating a Text

The benefits of annotation include:

  • Keeping track of key ideas and questions

  • Helping formulate thoughts and questions for deeper understanding

  • Fostering analyzing and interpreting texts

  • Encouraging the reader to make inferences and draw conclusions about the text

  • Allowing the reader to easily refer back to the text without rereading the text in its entirety

Annotating With a Purpose

Students are taught to read with a purpose, and they should also be taught to annotate with a purpose. Teaching students to annotate with a purpose will help them focus on what is most important about the text.

When teaching annotation I instruct students to use the following symbols:

  • Underline key ideas and major points.

  • Write a ? next to anything that is confusing, such as unfamiliar words or unclear information.

  • Circle key words or phrases.

  • Put an ! next to surprising or important information or information that helps you make a connection.

model-annotating-a-text-i-have-a-dream-speech-750px.png

Download Now

How to Model Close Reading Annotation 

My "I Have a Dream" Close Reading Kit includes resources for teaching close reading annotation! In the kit you'll find an instructional guide for teachers and annotations for the first 10 paragraphs of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.

Here's how to use the first two resources in the kit:

Explain to students that the annotations of skillful readers identify what they don’t understand and point out major facts or ideas they want to remember and use in their discussions and writing. Annotation also encourages readers to make inferences and to draw conclusions about the text, as well as to make interpretations on a deeper level.

Next, review the symbols students should use when annotating a text. Caution students that over-annotating will be confusing rather than helpful.

Then read the first 10 paragraphs of the "I Have a Dream" speech and pause to model how to annotate with your students. You may want to make individual copies of the "I Have a Dream" close reading annotations for students to keep handy (this is included in the Close Reading Kit).

Additional Close Reading Activities

In addition to the annotation resources, the "I Have a Dream" Close Reading Kit includes an extension activity to analyze the author's craft (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s word choice) and a guide to improving comprehension by focusing on the big idea of each stanza.

In addition to the annotation resources, the I Have a Dream" Close Reading Kit includes an extension activity to analyze the author's craft (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s word choice) and a guide to improving comprehension by focusing on the big idea of each stanza.

Download Now

In Summary

Teaching your students how to annotate a text with a purpose will help them keep track of key ideas, unfamiliar words or concepts, and will help them formulate thoughts and questions. It also encourages the reader to make inferences and draw conclusions about the text, as well as, make interpretations on a deeper level. Annotating allows the reader to easily refer back to the text without rereading the text in its entirety.

Download the "I Have a Dream" Close Reading Kit to work on close reading in your classroom!